Seattle retailer Amazon.com Inc. to hire 33,000 employees in corporate & tech roles



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Seattle retailer Amazon.com Inc. to hire 33,000 employees in corporate & tech roles

In what could be contemplated as a latest sign of a booming online retailing industry amid a new-normal pandemic-era economy while other sectors were languishing lavishly, the Seattle, Washington-headquartered world’s No.

1 online retailer Amazon.com Inc. said on Wednesday that it would be hiring as many as 33,000 employees for corporate alongside tech roles over the next few months, marking up the largest number of white collar and tech job openings for the online retailer.

Apart from that, the Seattle retailer Amazon.com Inc., which had been in a hiring spree since the onset of the pandemic outbreak amid a strident upsurge in demands in online orders due to the pandemic driven stay-at-home orders, had also added at its announcement that the jobs would not be similar to those what it usually offers ahead of the busy holiday shopping season.

In point of fact, the world’s largest retailer had also been quoted saying that it would hold an online career fair on September 16 in order to gather resumes, while Amazon’s Vice President of workforce development Ardine Williams had told that the potential candidates would be provided with an opportunity to attend an interview with a recruiter adding that the average salary of corporate or tech jobs at Amazon.com Inc.

would likely to be $150,000 per annum.

Amazon could afford to grow its workforce, suggest analysts

In tandem, while a number of US retailers had been seeking bankruptcy protections following the forced closure measures adopted in a bid to contain the outbreak, Amazon has been one of the few American companies which had been thriving during the pandemic-led closures as people have reportedly turned online to order a swathe of goods ranging from groceries to households to clothing, eventually helping the company coffer a record revenues and profits over the second quarter of the year despite an additional spending of $4 billion on cleaning the supplies and workers’ bonuses.

Besides, as a raft of brick-and-mortar retailers such as JC Penney, J Crew, Brooks Brothers alongside a many more went bankrupt and a number of heavyweight whales likes of Coca-Cola had been forced to announce furloughs and layoffs, Amazon.com Inc.

had met with a high-flying demand, while online orders had soared at such level that the Seattle-based online retailer had to bring in 175,000 workers to pack and ship orders at its warehouses all over the globe.