Menlo Park’s Facebook says it could not be blamed for US failing to meet vaccine goal



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Menlo Park’s Facebook says it could not be blamed for US failing to meet vaccine goal

A day after the US President Joe Biden had accused the social networking giant Facebook Inc of killing millions of innocent people by helping spread a swathe of pandemic associated misinformation which in effect had been prompting people not to get inoculated while proliferating the pandemic’s infectiousness, the Menlo Park, California-headquartered ad-tech behemoth had fended off the claim on Saturday saying the facts would tell a different tale.

Voicing a strident tone, Facebook Inc Vice President Guy Rosen said in a corporate blog post late on Saturday, “The data shows that 85% of Facebook users in the US have been or want to be vaccinated against COVID-19.

President Biden’s goal was for 70% of Americans to be vaccinated by July 4. Facebook is not the reason this goal was missed. However, if truth is to be told, researchers and lawmakers across the globe had long been accusing Facebook Inc of failing to remove pandemic-led misinformation from its platforms, as pandemic-wary people often turned to social media sites likes of Twitter, YouTube alongside Facebook among others to get a glimpse on what could happen after taking vaccines against the pandemic pathogen.

Facebook fends off Biden charges

Alongside this, latest Facebook Inc statement came forth a day after the US President Joe Biden had said to the reporters in the White House, “They're killing people. ... Look, the only pandemic we have is among the unvaccinated.

And they're killing people”. However, Facebook Inc had declined the claims adding it had launched rules against making false claims about the pandemic and the vaccines against it, while it had been offering reliable information about the topics, too.

Nonetheless, a swamp of slanderous misinformation flocking on social medias regarding the pandemic and the vaccines against it, had downhearted a number of people about vaccines, said industry analysts and researchers.