Polygon blockchain has a peculiarity that makes it highly appreciated

Polygon reaches a capacity of 7,000 transactions per second and a finality time of 2-3 seconds

by Lorenzo Ciotti
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Polygon blockchain has a peculiarity that makes it highly appreciated

Polygon offers a layer-2 that amplifies its functionality. Polygon reaches a capacity of 7,000 transactions per second and a finality time of 2-3 seconds. Polygon provides security support to other networks and connects them to its ecosystem, facilitating communication between them.

By providing a platform for running Ethereum DApps on a connected blockchain system, Polygon maintains the security of the Ethereum network and offers the benefits of a tier-1 chain. In comparison, Ethereum offers only 14 transactions per second and significantly higher fees elevated.

Therefore, the choice between the two options must be weighed carefully. This blockchain uses a modified proof of stake consensus mechanism that enables a consensus to be achieved with every block. The proof of stake method requires network participants to stake their MATIC tokens, in exchange for the right to validate Polygon network transactions.

The Polygon network aims to address problems within the Ethereum platform, namely high transaction fees and slow processing speeds. Former US President Donald Trump launched a series of digital art NFTs minted on the Polygon network for sale to the public for $99 USD each.

Some tips about a blockchain

Open blockchains are easier to use than proprietary ones, which still require physical access to views, even though they are also open to the public. Since all early blockchains were open, a controversy arose over the definition of a blockchain.

One topic of this debate is whether a private system with verifiers authorized by a central authority can be considered a blockchain. Proponents of permissioned or at least private chains argue that the term blockchain can be applied to any data structure that collects data in timestamped blocks.

These blockchains are used as a distributed version of a multi-version concurrency check (MVCC). Just as an MVCC prevents two transactions from modifying the same database record, the blockchain prevents two transactions from spending the same single output.

Instead, opponents of this idea say the permission-closed system resembles traditional corporate databases that doesn't support decentralized verification of data. They also argue that this system is not protected against manipulation and review by users.

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