FIA admits Red Bull budget cap breach investigation and penalty took too long



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FIA admits Red Bull budget cap breach investigation and penalty took too long

FIA President Mohammed Ben Sulayem acknowledged over the weekend that the FIA’s response to Red Bull’s budget cap breach took too long. Aside from that, amid growing criticisms over the punitive measures that Red Bull F1 team have received last year, FIA President Mohammed Ben Sulayem said that he is brewing off an option to make changes on penalties for budget cap breach.

In point of fact, latest remarks from FIA President Mohammed Ben Sulayem came forth just a couple of weeks after the Red Bull F1 team have been met with a penalty of $7 million in cash alongside a 10 per cent reduction in spending on wind-tunnel development due to a breach of 2022 budget cap.

Ferrari budget cap breach penalty took too long, says FIA president

Aside from that, followed by the reveal of an FIA statement that Red Bull had spent nearly a $0.5 million above an allotted $145 million last year alongside an unclaimed £1.4 million in UK tax credit, Red Bull’s Horner said that the punishments are “very limited,” Mercedes boss Toto Wolff said that the Red Bull’s budget cap breach has been an “open secret”.

Meanwhile, adding that he is confident the FIA could speed up the issues next year, Mohammed Ben Sulayem said, “The only thing I would say is that what we did in September or October should have been done earlier.

As it was the first year, we learned from it and we are still learning. It's better to do it in May and not just in October to do it. I believe that there was a balance between the financial and also the sporting penalties there, but we learned a lot and a big review is going into it.

Because is it the way that we go, because who knows in the first year what is going be the outcome? Some people, If you look at the other teams, they will say we have been light on them with the penalty and some of them want them to be hanged and they want to see blood.

So where do you draw [the line]? We have to be fair also -- do we want to get rid of them or do we want them to straighten up and not do it [in the future]”.