Germany's gas supply has been reduced by 60 percent in just two days



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Germany's gas supply has been reduced by 60 percent in just two days

Russian gas company Gazprom began early Thursday morning reducing the amount of gas it supplies to Germany via the Nord Stream 1 pipeline to a daily maximum of 67 million cubic meters. The reduction in gas supply came after the company announced that it would reduce the maximum amount of gas delivered from 167 million cubic meters per day to 100 million cubic meters.

With the latest reduction, the company has reduced the amount of gas in Germany by about 60 percent in two days, and Nord Stream 1 is the main gas pipeline that delivers Russian gas to that country. German Economy Minister Robert Habeck has accused Russia of trying to create discomfort and a move to increase gas prices, but added that Germany can still supply alternative gas supplies in an alternative way, albeit at a higher price.

German gas storage facilities are currently at 56 percent occupancy. Russia's majority state-owned Gazprom said gas supply disruptions were caused by repairs to the gas compression unit, although the claim was disputed by the German federal agency.

Russia has cut off gas supplies to several European countries

Russia has cut off gas supplies to several European countries in recent weeks over disagreements with sanctions imposed on it as a result of its invasion of Ukraine, and because European countries have refused to pay for gas in rubles, which Russia has demanded to support its currency.

Energy prices have risen significantly due to reduced gas supplies from Russia to Europe, and many energy analysts fear that Russia could close the valves to Europe to put pressure on it. The Nord Stream pipeline was commissioned in 2012 and delivers gas from northwestern Russia to Germany via the Baltic Sea.

The launch of another pipeline, Nord Stream 2, that was set to double Russian gas deliveries to Germany was halted in response to Moscow's military action in Ukraine. EU countries have scrambled to reduce their dependency on Russian energy but are divided about imposing a natural gas embargo as several member states are heavily reliant on Moscow's energy supplies.