Germany is desperately looking for workers, here is what they want



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Germany is desperately looking for workers, here is what they want

At the security checkpoints, people lose their tempers because the queues are too long and they do not get to their planes. Kindergartens are withdrawing their admission certificates because there are not enough teachers. Whether it's industry, hospitals or trades - labor shortages are a growing problem in Germany.

The arrival of workers from abroad does not work as imagined. The Immigration Act should now be reformed, writes Deutsche Welle. It could have been a nice evening. "I would have a table for you," said the owner of the restaurant over the phone, "but unfortunately there is no one who can cook for you."

This is not a joke. There are not enough cooks, assistant cooks and waiters in the whole of Germany. But the labor force is not only a problem in the hospitality industry. Trains are canceled because there are not enough drivers.

Suitcases pile up at airports because there is no one to reload them. At the security checkpoints, people lose their tempers because the queues are too long and they do not get to their planes. Kindergartens are withdrawing their admission certificates because there are not enough teachers.

148 occupations are at risk


In a survey by the German Chamber of Industry and Commerce, which represents the interests of several million companies in industry, commerce and services, 56 percent of companies complain about the lack of workers and consider it one of the biggest threats to their business.

The German labor agency records a labor shortage in 148 occupations, and another 122 occupations are at risk. On average, it takes eight months until a nursing home finds a caregiver. On average, construction companies wait half a year until they find workers.

Tenders for more than 1.7 million vacancies were announced across the country. "Five to ten years ago, we only advertised in advertisements to sell our services. Today, we pay for ads in all kinds of media to find workers," complains Markus Winter, director of the IDS company in Baden-Württemberg, which hires all kinds of workers.

The company has around 750 employees and needs staff in more than 20 professions, from locksmiths to painters, from forklift drivers to drivers of drinks delivery vans. The labor shortage did not appear suddenly. "We are now in a relatively dramatic situation that we have long predicted," says Herbert Brücker, a professor at the Institute for Labor Market and Occupational Research in Nuremberg.

According to his observations, demographic changes are now clearly noticeable. Germany loses about 350,000 members of the working age generation annually. At the same time, demographically strong generations will retire only in a few years. Experts like Brücker calculate that by 2035 there will be a shortage of seven million workers on the labor market.