Kremlin Spokesman Fires Back at European Countries over Black Sea Grain Deal

Kremlin Spokesman Dmitry Peskov has slammed European countries' stance on the Black Sea grain deal, characterizing it as "unconscionable."

by Faruk Imamovic
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Kremlin Spokesman Fires Back at European Countries over Black Sea Grain Deal

In a recent development that has increased tensions between global powers, Kremlin Spokesman Dmitry Peskov has slammed European countries' stance on the Black Sea grain deal, characterizing it as "unconscionable."

Europe's Position: A Matter of Debate

During a press briefing, Peskov delivered a sharp rebuttal to comments made by US Secretary of State Antony Blinken, who had previously decried Russia's decision to pull out of the grain deal as "unconscionable." "In this case, it would be more fitting to call the position of European countries unconscionable," Peskov fired back, visibly dissatisfied with the Western perspective.

This dispute clearly underscores the deep divisions that persist between Russia and the West. Moreover, Peskov made it clear that the Kremlin "categorically disagrees" with Blinken’s judgment, vehemently defending Russia's actions.

"Russia has fulfilled its obligations and extended the agreement several times, despite the fact that the Russia-related provisions of the agreement were never implemented," the Kremlin spokesman pointed out, emphasizing a sense of perceived betrayal.

Guterres' Role and The Ceased Agreement

Peskov also took the opportunity to commend the efforts of Mr. Guterres, presumably referencing United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres. "We highly appreciate the role of Mr.

Guterres in concluding this agreement; we highly rate Mr. Guterres’ efforts to attempt to persuade European countries to fulfill the obligations that they took upon themselves. Yet, unfortunately, this did not happen," the Kremlin official stated regretfully to the assembled reporters.

The Black Sea Grain Initiative agreement, which had stirred much controversy, ceased to function on July 17. According to Russian officials, the nation refused to agree to a further extension of the deal because the agreement’s provisions for lifting obstacles to the export of Russian agricultural products were never enacted.

This situation reflects the challenges in international trade agreements and underlines the diplomatic difficulties that can arise when commitments are perceived as not being met. As the world watches closely, the next moves from Russia, the European countries, and the US could significantly influence the dynamics of international trade and politics.

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