Jin: "Turkey is One of The Most Important Economic Partners in Europe"

South Korea's perception of Turkey has significantly evolved over the past few years, with the Republic now identifying the Eurasian country as a crucial cog in its economic wheel.

by Faruk Imamovic
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Jin: "Turkey is One of The Most Important Economic Partners in Europe"

South Korea's perception of Turkey has significantly evolved over the past few years, with the Republic now identifying the Eurasian country as a crucial cog in its economic wheel. This significant revelation was shared by South Korean Foreign Minister, Park Jin, who recently embarked on a three-day diplomatic visit to Turkey.

Cementing Economic Ties

"Turkey is one of the most important economic partners in Europe for South Korea," proclaimed Minister Park, underscoring the crucial role Turkey plays in South Korea's international economic strategy.

Indeed, the tangible presence of approximately 160 South Korean businesses currently operating in Turkey further illustrates the depth and substance of this economic relationship. But the Foreign Minister was not just on an economy-centred mission.

His trip had a broader significance – nurturing and bolstering the strategic partnership between the two nations, a collaboration poised to expand across various sectors.

Defense and Disaster Relief: A Multifaceted Partnership

One notable aspect of Park's visit was his attendance at the 16th International Defense Industry Fair (IDEF'23) in Istanbul.

There, he met with Turkish National Defense Minister, Yasar Güler, and engaged in discussions regarding bilateral defense cooperation. "We talked about the cooperation between the two countries in the field of defense.

There are good examples of cooperation between South Korea and Turkey, such as the Altay armored vehicle and the K9," Park recounted, citing two major collaborative defense projects. This partnership extends beyond defense, with South Korea actively participating in humanitarian efforts in Turkey.

Following the destructive earthquakes that struck Turkey in February, South Korea provided $5 million in aid and committed to constructing 2,000 temporary settlements for survivors. "The Korean government continues to support earthquake survivors so that they can overcome the damage caused by the earthquake and have a sustainable social and economic life," Park assured.

A Bright Future Ahead

In Park's estimation, the prospects for further industrial cooperation between the two nations are positively glowing. Reflecting on the established cooperation between their land forces, the Foreign Minister expressed a hopeful vision for the future: "I hope that the cooperation between the land forces, which is currently active, will extend to the navy."

Europe
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