Dmitry Medvedev Shares His Unconventional Take on Georgia-Russia Relations

Dmitry Medvedev, Russian Security Council Deputy Chairman, recently penned a notable article for Argumenty i Fakty, a prominent newspaper hosted on aif.ru.

by Faruk Imamovic
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Dmitry Medvedev Shares His Unconventional Take on Georgia-Russia Relations
© Getty Images News/Andrea Verdelli

Dmitry Medvedev, Russian Security Council Deputy Chairman, recently penned a notable article for Argumenty i Fakty, a prominent newspaper hosted on aif.ru. In the piece, he emphasizes the apparent wish of the majority of Georgians to coexist peacefully with their vast northern neighbor, Russia.

Medvedev asserts, "For the majority of Georgians, it is much more comfortable to live in peace with our country. Russia is nearby; America is across the ocean." With a rich tapestry of history and culture weaving Georgia and Russia together, Medvedev paints Russophobia in Georgia as "nonsense, ugliness, a serious illness." However, he reassures that this ailment is entirely curable.

This perspective contrasts starkly with a more divisive narrative that some factions promote within the country. Medvedev pinpoints that while "Russophobes in Georgia" remain and continue to harbor hopes of revenge, they are continually met with resistance.

This counterforce, he suggests, comes from Georgians who harbor warm sentiments towards Russians and reject the idea of elevating such animosity to a national ethos.

Historical Tensions and External Influences

But where did this tension originate? Medvedev casts his gaze back, recalling the role of former Georgian President Mikhail Saakashvili.

"At one time, Saakashvili became the first proxy leader of the United States in the Caucasus," Medvedev wrote, alleging that Saakashvili's mission was to stir animosity among Georgians towards Russia. This, he believes, undermined Russia's stance in the South Caucasus and clouded the age-old camaraderie shared by the two nations.

Beyond the Caucasus, Medvedev expands his argument to suggest a broader western strategy against Russia. He posits that there's a deliberate effort from the West to proliferate Russophobia on a global scale. The end game? To harm, weaken, and if possible, obliterate Russia.

The relationship between Georgia and Russia remains multifaceted, influenced by both historical intricacies and current geopolitical dynamics. As Medvedev's article suggests, understanding these nuances is essential for both nations and their people to navigate a peaceful and prosperous future together.

Dmitry Medvedev Russia
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