EU Asylum Applications Rise by 25% in June

Recent official statistics have shown a sharp rise in the number of individuals seeking asylum within the European Union.

by Faruk Imamovic
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EU Asylum Applications Rise by 25% in June
© Getty Images News/Cristopher Furlong

Recent official statistics have shown a sharp rise in the number of individuals seeking asylum within the European Union. In June this year, the number of first-time asylum applicants reached 83,385, marking a significant 25% increase compared to the same month in the previous year.

Trends and Top Countries for Asylum

While the overall numbers are rising, there’s been a drop in the number of people reapplying after an earlier rejection. These "returnees" have decreased by 9% compared to last year, with the count standing at 5,795.

A closer look at the data reveals some interesting patterns concerning the preferred destinations within the EU. Germany remains at the forefront, with a staggering 23,190 applications submitted. Other popular countries include Spain, which received 16,075 applications; France, with 12,475; and Italy, tallying 10,730.

Combined, these four nations bear the weight of three-quarters of all the EU’s asylum requests.

Where Are They Coming From?

As for the origins of these asylum seekers, Syria continues to be the predominant source, accounting for 13,150 of the applications.

It's followed by Afghanistan (7,775) and Venezuela (6,925), and Colombia (6,165). However, one notable change is the drastic reduction in the number of Ukrainians applying for asylum, due to the ongoing conflict in their nation.

A mere 1,065 applications were submitted in June. This is a significant drop when compared to February of the previous year, which saw 2,100 applications, and a sharp spike in March with 12,185 submissions. This decline is not solely attributed to fewer refugees arriving in the EU.

Many Ukrainians have already been granted temporary protection within the Union, leading to fewer new applications. The rise in asylum applications in the EU points to global circumstances pushing people to seek refuge. While the EU wrestles with the logistical and humanitarian aspects of these rising numbers, it remains crucial for member states to collaboratively address the needs of these individuals in search of safety and stability.

The fluctuating trends also underscore the ever-evolving nature of global conflicts and crises, calling for dynamic solutions and understanding.

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