U.S. Government Opposes Bankman-Fried's Temporary Release Ahead of Trial

The United States government has once again voiced its opposition to Sam Bankman-Fried’s (often referred to as SBF) request for a temporary release from jail.

by Faruk Imamovic
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U.S. Government Opposes Bankman-Fried's Temporary Release Ahead of Trial
© Getty Images News/Micahel M. Santiago

The United States government has once again voiced its opposition to Sam Bankman-Fried’s (often referred to as SBF) request for a temporary release from jail. This comes as the latest development before his major trial slated for October 3rd.

A Pattern of Denied Requests

In a letter addressed to Judge Lewis Kaplan dated September 27, the U.S. government clearly articulated its stance against SBF's latest bid for temporary release, which was officially submitted on September 25.

The defendant has been persistent in his appeals, and this isn't the first time he has faced such a denial. The key reason behind the opposition, as stated by the government, is that SBF's claim of being unable to “meaningfully participate” in his own defense does not hold enough weight.

Especially when the potential dangers of his release, namely “danger to the community and/or flight,” are taken into consideration. The government’s letter to the judge also highlighted that SBF's recent appeal “recycles” generalized claims.

In fact, the court has already objected to similar requests from the defendant twice in the past month. The initial denial was issued on September 12. Back then, the court cited multiple reasons, one of them being SBF’s extensive access to electronic discovery for over seven months before his bail was revoked shortly before his trial.

The court also noted that SBF failed to provide any specifics about the materials he claims he can't access. Further solidifying the government's stance, a three-judge panel from the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit also denied SBF's release plea on September 21.

Their statement went on to label the arguments provided as “unpersuasive”. What was even more significant was the Court of Appeals' affirmation, which indicated probable cause to believe that SBF had attempted to tamper with two witnesses.

Mounting Charges and Two Upcoming Trials

Sam Bankman-Fried’s criminal trial, set to unfold in New York City, could potentially be a landmark case. During this trial, SBF will face seven counts, all tied to alleged fraudulent activities during his tenure at FTX and Alameda Research.

But this is just the tip of the iceberg. Come March 2024, SBF is due to stand trial again, this time for five additional counts in a separate criminal case. However, the tech magnate maintains his innocence, having pleaded not guilty to all charges thus far.

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