Bill Gates reveals that eating synthetic meat will save the planet

Bill Gates and his foundation continue to fund startups like Impossible, Beyond Meat and Upside Foods

by Lorenzo Ciotti
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Bill Gates reveals that eating synthetic meat will save the planet
© Alex Wong / Staff Getty Images News

As reported by the CNBC, Bill Gates said eating synthetic meat is a must to enslave the world. The Microsoft co-founder revealed that the contribution of innovations like these to the climate cause will be fundamental. Emissions from the agricultural sector are equal to approximately 25% of the total, coming mostly from livestock and the use of fertilizers.

Gates said about: "In fact, if livestock were a country, it would be the third largest emitter in the world. I am convinced that plant-based is the future and I want to be the one who plants these seeds. You can get used to the different flavor, which after all, it is in the process of improving." Bill Gates and his foundation continue to fund startups like Impossible, Beyond Meat and Upside Foods.

He explained: "They are working well, although many people expect them to improve further. The course is good, I am optimistic."

Synthetic meat and first public demonstration

On August 5, 2013, the world's first lab-grown hamburger was cooked and eaten at a press conference in London.

Scientists at Maastricht University in the Netherlands, led by Prof. Mark Post, took stem cells from a cow and grew them into strips of muscle which they combined to produce a hamburger. The meat was cooked by chef Richard McGeown of Couch's Great House Restaurant in Polperro, Cornwall, and tasted by food critic Hanni Ruetzler, a food scholar from the Future Food Studio, and Josh Schonwald.

Ruetzler found that since there is no fat it is not juicy, and therefore the taste is not the best it could be, however he feels the intense flavour. He added that she is close to the meat, although less flavourful, but he considers the consistency to be perfect.

He concluded: "For me it's meat, it's something I can chew and I think it looks very similar."

He also stated that in a blind test he would have taken the product to be meat rather than a soy derivative.

The tissue for the London demonstration was grown in May 2013, using at least 20,000 thin strips of laboratory-produced muscle tissue.

Donations of around €250,000 came from an anonymous donor, later revealed to be Sergey Brin. Prof. Mark Post said there is no reason why it couldn't be cheaper, and that he would be very happy to reduce livestock numbers worldwide by a million-fold. Post also estimated that it will probably take at least a decade before the process is commercially viable.

Bill Gates
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