MGM Resorts Faces Over $100 Million in Damages from Cyberattack

Las Vegas-based MGM Resorts is grappling with the repercussions of a significant cyberattack that took place last month.

by Faruk Imamovic
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MGM Resorts Faces Over $100 Million in Damages from Cyberattack
© Getty Images News/Ethan Miller

Las Vegas-based MGM Resorts is grappling with the repercussions of a significant cyberattack that took place last month. The casino titan expects the data breach to cost upwards of $100 million, revealing the severity of the incident that disrupted operations across multiple states.

A Ten-Day Shutdown

Detected on September 10, the breach prompted MGM Resorts to act swiftly by shutting down specific casino and hotel computer systems across their various U.S. properties to safeguard data. The impact was keenly felt on the ground, as customers took to social media to voice their grievances.

Many reported issues ranging from an inability to process credit card transactions and withdraw money from ATMs, to troubles accessing their hotel rooms. Following a ten-day hiatus, MGM announced on September 20 that its computer systems were back up and running.

Bill Hornbuckle, the CEO of MGM Resorts, attempted to assuage concerns in a letter addressed to the company’s patrons. He stated, “While we experienced disruptions at some of our properties, operations at our affected properties have returned to normal, and the vast majority of our systems have been restored.

We also believe that this attack is contained”.

Data Compromised but Not Financial Details

Hornbuckle went on to assure customers that, although hackers managed to access a variety of personal details, critical financial information remained untouched.

The stolen data included names, contact information, driver's license details, Social Security numbers, and passport numbers of clients who engaged with MGM before March 2019. Despite the unsettling nature of this breach, MGM is yet to find evidence that hackers have exploited the pilfered data for fraudulent activities or identity theft.

In a gesture of goodwill and a bid to restore trust, Hornbuckle mentioned that MGM would be reaching out to affected customers through email. They will be offering complimentary identity protection and credit monitoring services.

"We regret this outcome and sincerely apologize to those impacted," Hornbuckle lamented in his message to patrons, emphasizing the company’s commitment to rectifying the situation and ensuring better cybersecurity measures moving forward.

Las Vegas
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