EU Ministers Call for Speedier Deportation of Threatening Individuals

European Union (EU) interior ministers underscored the urgent need to expedite the return processes of individuals deemed dangerous

by Faruk Imamovic
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EU Ministers Call for Speedier Deportation of Threatening Individuals
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In a recent gathering in Luxembourg, European Union (EU) interior ministers underscored the urgent need to expedite the return processes of individuals deemed dangerous, particularly following recent attacks in France and Belgium by radicalized persons.

Revising the Return Directive

A proposal from 2018 sought to amend the existing "return directive," which, if adopted, would prevent EU member states from allocating a period for voluntary return to third-country nationals who are in the EU irregularly and are perceived as threats to public security.

Essentially, it aims to ensure that individuals who represent a clear danger are promptly deported from European territories. European Commissioner for Home Affairs, Ylva Johansson, emphasized the necessity of this revision by stating, “A person who represents a threat to the security of a member state is also a threat to the security of another member state.

This is why it should be mandatory to immediately send these people back”. Similarly, the tragic event in Brussels, where two Swedish football fans lost their lives and another was injured by a radicalized Tunisian individual, underscored the importance of these revised measures.

This Tunisian assailant had already been given an order to leave Belgian territory. Reflecting on this incident, Swedish Minister Gunnar Strömmer remarked, “It must be an obligation for all of us to do this effectively”.

Commissioner Johansson also weighed in, viewing the incident as “a call to action” to push ahead with the proposed EU legislation.

Stalled Progress in the European Parliament

Despite the clear urgency and support from various EU member states, the revised directive remains stagnant in the European Parliament.

The need for action is palpable, especially given the potential risks posed by individuals who may take advantage of the existing loopholes in the directive. Expressing the growing impatience and concern, Commission Vice-President Margaritis Schinas urged the European Parliament, stating, “We expect the European Parliament to adopt its common position...

this is the time to do so”. The ongoing debate underscores the challenges in striking a balance between humanitarian considerations and security imperatives. As the EU grapples with these concerns, the call for prompt and decisive action resonates louder with each passing day.

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