Germany today adopted a law that aims to facilitate the deportation of migrants

Chancellor Scholz said last week that Germany must begin "large-scale" deportations of migrants who have no right to remain in the country

by Sededin Dedovic
SHARE
Germany today adopted a law that aims to facilitate the deportation of migrants
© Andreas Rentz / Getty Images

The German government, in a significant move, has given the green light to a bill aimed at streamlining the process of deporting unsuccessful asylum seekers. This decision comes in the wake of Chancellor Scholz's recent declaration that Germany must initiate "large-scale" deportations of migrants without a legitimate claim to remain within the nation's borders.

The draft legislation, requiring approval from the parliamentary majority to become law, introduces several provisions to enhance the efficiency of deportation procedures. One of the key changes in this bill is the extension of the maximum pre-deportation detention period from 10 days to 28 days.

This extension is seen as a measure to ensure that authorities have sufficient time to process deportations while adhering to due process. The bill also focuses on deporting individuals involved with criminal organizations, strengthening the government's stance on national security.

The situation has been further complicated by the arrival of over a million Ukrainians fleeing the Russian invasion

In another significant step, the law empowers authorities to conduct searches within residential buildings to locate documentation that would ascertain a person's identity without any doubt.

Moreover, the law removes the obligation for authorities to notify individuals in advance of deportation in certain cases, prioritizing the swift implementation of deportation orders. The urgency for such measures has grown due to the rapid increase in the number of asylum seekers entering the country, resulting in overcrowded migrant shelters in Germany.

The situation has been further complicated by the arrival of over a million Ukrainians fleeing the Russian invasion, adding to the burden on resources and infrastructure. Interior Minister Nancy Fesser had previously announced the proposed changes, citing statistics that indicate a 27% increase in deportations compared to the previous year.

She also expressed the need to address the situation of rejected asylum seekers who continue to reside in Germany under temporary permits, often due to factors like health conditions, dependent children with residency status, or a lack of proper identity documentation.

Looking ahead, Fesserova has outlined her plans to toughen penalties for those involved in migrant smuggling, with hopes of gaining government approval for these changes as early as November. She is also considering extending border controls at Germany's frontiers with Poland, the Czech Republic, and Switzerland to at least 20 days, emphasizing the nation's commitment to border security and sovereignty.

In essence, the approved bill signifies a significant shift in Germany's approach to managing migration and asylum, seeking to strike a balance between humanitarian considerations and national security concerns as the country faces increasing challenges in this realm.

Germany
SHARE