Gaza Conflict: UK Doctor Denied Safe Passage in Evacuation Chaos

In a distressing turn of events, Dr. Ahmed Sabra, a British doctor and National Health Service consultant, found himself stranded at the Rafah crossing on the Gaza-Egypt border.

by Faruk Imamovic
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Gaza Conflict: UK Doctor Denied Safe Passage in Evacuation Chaos
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In a distressing turn of events, Dr. Ahmed Sabra, a British doctor and National Health Service consultant, found himself stranded at the Rafah crossing on the Gaza-Egypt border. Despite his attempts to escape the escalating conflict in Gaza, Egyptian officials denied him passage, citing his absence from the list of approved evacuees.

A Family's Perilous Journey Interrupted

Dr. Sabra, a resident of Swansea West in Wales, was in Gaza with his family when hostilities intensified following attacks by Hamas on October 7. Geraint Davies, the local MP for Swansea West, relayed Sabra's fraught experience, including a video and voice notes recorded during his attempt to cross into Egypt with his wife and children.

The family's journey to safety was abruptly halted at the Rafah crossing. While Sabra’s family was allowed to pass, he was not, due to his name being omitted from the list of foreign nationals cleared for evacuation.

The refusal to allow his passage effectively sent him back into a war zone, a situation he described as a "death sentence" in a message shared by Davies.

Calls for Intervention and Official Responses

In his communications, Dr.

Sabra urgently appealed to the British government for evacuation, emphasizing the dire need for intervention by the Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office (FCDO). Davies, advocating for Sabra, expressed dismay at the doctor's predicament, highlighting the lack of shelter and limited resources available to him in a dangerous environment.

The doctor, along with three other British nationals, reportedly waited for two and a half days at the border, hoping for assistance from the British embassy. Despite temporary provisions of food and a place to rest, Sabra was eventually sent back to Gaza.

The UK’s Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office, responding to inquiries, stated that they are actively working to ensure the evacuation of British nationals from Gaza. They detailed the process of submitting information to Israeli and Egyptian authorities for review and permissions.

However, the FCDO's statement did not specifically address Dr. Sabra's case. As the situation evolves, the plight of Dr. Sabra and other individuals caught in conflict zones highlights the complexities and challenges of international evacuation efforts.

The incident raises questions about the responsibilities and capabilities of governments in safeguarding their citizens abroad during times of crisis.

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