The fastest graphics card ever: Diamonds in the Nvidia GPU

Diamond Foundry claims that diamond wafers could be 17,200 times better than silicon and 60 times better than silicon carbide

by Sededin Dedovic
SHARE
The fastest graphics card ever: Diamonds in the Nvidia GPU
© Graphically Challenged / Youtube channel

The relentless pursuit of enhanced performance in silicon chips has become a hallmark of the semiconductor industry. As chipmakers strive to pack more power into smaller spaces, the challenge of heat dissipation looms large, threatening to impede further advancements.

Diamond Foundry, a company at the forefront of innovative materials research, has emerged with a revolutionary solution – diamonds. In contrast to the conventional glass substrates employed by chip manufacturers like Intel, Diamond Foundry has meticulously developed a technology that utilizes diamond wafer substrates.

This unique approach promises to unlock unprecedented levels of chip efficiency and pave the way for sustained peak performance. The company's remarkable achievement lies in its ability to fabricate single-crystal diamonds on scalable substrates, enabling the production of diamond wafers suitable for GPU and CPU applications.

Employing a technique known as heteroepitaxy, Diamond Foundry has managed to create slightly mismatched crystalline layers, resulting in a material with exceptional thermal conductivity.

Up to 3x faster than silicon

Diamond Foundry tested the pinnacle of its manufacturing process on an unnamed premium Nvidia GPU and announced that it achieved performance that was up to three times the best recorded performance of the same GPU with a normal configuration.

The company's ambitions extend far beyond GPUs, envisioning a future where diamond wafers revolutionize the entire semiconductor landscape. Diamond Foundry claims that its technology could surpass silicon by a factor of 17,200 and silicon carbide by 60 times, once manufacturing processes are refined.

While the precise timeline for commercial availability remains elusive, the prospect of diamond-powered CPUs and GPUs holds immense promise. The impact on pricing is another intriguing aspect, as the cost-effectiveness of this technology will undoubtedly influence its adoption.

In conclusion, Diamond Foundry's pioneering efforts in harnessing the power of diamonds for chip manufacturing represent a significant leap forward in the pursuit of performance and efficiency. As the company continues to refine its processes, the tantalizing possibility of diamond-powered electronics draws closer to reality, heralding a new era of technological innovation.

SHARE