International Court of Justice to Hear South Africa's Case Against Israel

The International Court of Justice (ICJ) announced on Wednesday that it will conduct public hearings next week regarding the allegations of genocide by Israel in its conflict with Hamas in Gaza.

by Faruk Imamovic
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International Court of Justice to Hear South Africa's Case Against Israel
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The International Court of Justice (ICJ) announced on Wednesday that it will conduct public hearings next week regarding the allegations of genocide by Israel in its conflict with Hamas in Gaza. This follows a recent application by South Africa requesting the ICJ to consider "provisional measures" — emergency steps to preserve the rights of a party involved in the dispute.

South Africa's request, submitted last week, calls on the ICJ to implement measures to protect the Palestinian people and to ensure Israel's adherence to its obligations under the Genocide Convention. These obligations include refraining from engaging in genocide, as well as preventing and punishing such actions.

South Africa is set to present its oral arguments on January 11, followed by Israel's presentation the next day.

Political Responses and Resignations in the US

The Israeli government has responded to these developments, with a spokesperson stating on Tuesday that Israel will appear before the ICJ to counter what it terms as "South Africa's absurd blood libel." This statement reflects the contentious nature of the allegations and the high stakes involved in the upcoming hearings.

In the United States, the conflict and its handling by the Biden administration have led to significant political fallout. Tariq Habash, a Palestinian American policy adviser in the US Department of Education, resigned on Wednesday, citing his inability to remain silent in the face of the administration's perceived inaction.

In his resignation letter, Habash expressed his dismay at the refusal of the president to call for an immediate and permanent ceasefire, a stance he believes is untenable with the beliefs of many Americans. Habash's resignation is the second known departure of a US official over policy disagreements related to the conflict, following the earlier resignation of former State Department official Josh Paul.

When asked for comment on Habash's resignation, a Department of Education spokesperson extended best wishes for his future endeavors, without directly addressing the concerns raised in his resignation.

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