Google Limits Election Queries on Gemini Chatbot

Google's taking steps to make sure the election info you get from its Gemini chatbot is legit.

by Faruk Imamovic
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Google Limits Election Queries on Gemini Chatbot
© Getty Images/Leon Neal

Google's taking steps to make sure the election info you get from its Gemini chatbot is legit. With all the talk about fake news and misinformation, they're putting a tight leash on what kind of election stuff Gemini can talk about, especially with big elections coming up in the US and India this spring.

Keeping Things Real Online

After some hiccups with an AI tool they had to pull back in February—thanks to it messing up some historical facts and getting people riled up—Google's being extra careful. They introduced this tool as part of a big makeover for their AI tech, but it ended up causing more trouble than it was worth by spreading potential misinformation.

In a March 12 blog post called "Supporting the 2024 Indian General Election," Google laid out its game plan to dodge these tech snafus in the future. They're basically saying, "We're on it," promising to keep an eye on the election-related answers Gemini gives out.

They want to make sure they're handing out info that's as accurate and helpful as possible.

The World's Taking Notice

It's not just a Google or a US thing. Misinformation's a global headache. Places like South Africa and India are gearing up for their own elections, with India telling tech companies to get a thumbs up from the government before they let loose any AI tools that might not be totally reliable.

They're trying to stop wrong info from spreading around. Public AI tools have gotten so good that fake political videos—deepfakes—are popping up, making it hard for folks to figure out what's true and what's not.

Senator Mark Warner from the US Senate Intelligence Committee mentioned back in February that the US might not be as ready as it should be to handle election fraud in the next big election in 2024. And over in Europe, they're setting up rules to try to keep AI from spreading fake news, with Meta (you know, the company behind Facebook and Instagram) coming up with its own plan to tackle the problem on its platforms.

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