USA to Require All New Vehicles to Have Advanced Automatic Braking Systems by 2029

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has announced new federal standards for car safety that will come into effect in 5 years, reports Endgadget

by Sededin Dedovic
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USA to Require All New Vehicles to Have Advanced Automatic Braking Systems by 2029
© Drew Angerer / Getty Images

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has announced new federal standards for car safety. These standards include a requirement for advanced automatic braking systems for all new vehicles, which manufacturers must comply with by 2029 as reported by Engadget.

This applies to all passenger vehicles and light trucks. Emergency automatic braking systems must be capable of stopping a vehicle traveling at speeds up to 100 km/h and avoiding collisions. These systems must also take into account pedestrians traveling at speeds up to 72 km/h, both during the day and at night.

Emergency automatic braking systems use a variety of sensors, lasers, and cameras to detect collisions. When a collision is unavoidable, the system automatically brakes or applies braking assistance to help the driver stop quickly and safely.

It's important to note that manufacturers already include these systems in 90% of new cars, but many of these tools do not meet the specified speed thresholds. The NHTSA states that most manufacturers should meet these requirements with the help of software updates.

In the United States alone, there were over 41,000 fatalities in 2023. The federal agency estimates that these new regulations will prevent over 360 road fatalities annually and should also reduce more than 24,000 injuries.

Significant savings on property damage costs are also expected. Kathy Chase, president of the Advocates for Highway and Auto Safety, said the new regulations are "a big win for all consumers and public safety." In 2023, there were over 41,000 car-related fatalities in the U.S., a slight decrease compared to the previous year.

However, the auto industry itself isn't quite as optimistic about this requirement. The Alliance for Automotive Innovation, a lobbying group that represents automakers, called on the NHTSA to consider other options. One of the main proposals is lowering the speed threshold in certain cases.

The group stated that significant hardware and software changes would be required to achieve a level of performance that no currently manufactured vehicle can meet. In this regard, tests conducted by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety suggest that these systems will likely require significant modifications to adequately meet the requirement.

The research group noted that it tested crash avoidance systems on 10 small SUVs at speeds up to 70 km/h and many of them failed to stop in time to avoid a collision in the most challenging test scenarios. The Subaru Forester and Honda CR-V performed the best.

Heavy vehicles, such as larger trucks, could also receive new requirements in the near future. The NHTSA is currently collaborating with the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, the truck safety agency, to establish similar standards for heavy vehicles.

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