CD Projekt Red: We see no place for microtransactions in single player games

The studio's latest success, Cyberpunk 2077, recently hit $750 million in revenue, and it did so without relying on microtransactions

by Sededin Dedovic
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CD Projekt Red: We see no place for microtransactions in single player games
© Blakwoodz / Youtube channel

Microtransactions are an inevitable topic in the gaming world today. This monetization strategy has become so normalized that people have no problem spending tens of dollars on simple beauty items. However, studio CD Projekt Red (CDPR), known for the acclaimed "The Witcher" and "Cyberpunk" series, is taking a stand against microtransactions in single-player games, putting the player experience first.

This Studio is considered one of the most popular in the world, and with statements like this, it will definitely expand its base of players and users. CDPR made its opposition to microtransactions clear in a statement from its CFO Piotr Nielubowicz: "We see no place for microtransactions in single-player games." This is a refreshing attitude in an industry where it often feels like game content is being sliced and diced to be monetized later.

Although CDPR rejects microtransactions for the singleplayer experience, the studio does not rule out their application in future multiplayer projects. This leaves room for flexibility and potential funding for games with online components, but protects the traditional, content-rich singleplayer format that made the studio famous and was inevitable in the early era of gaming.

CDPR made a name for itself with games like "The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt," which provided massive value and additional content after launch without relying on microtransactions. The studio's recent success with "Cyberpunk 2077" shows that even ambitious projects can be financed without this controversial practice.

The game reached $750 million in revenue, proving that quality and rich player experience can be enough for commercial success. CDPR's stance against microtransactions in singleplayer games is good news for gamers. This means that the studio focuses on creating a complete and satisfying experience from the very beginning, rather than parceling out content for later sale.

This approach shows respect for the player's time and money, but also once again proves the old adage that a quality product in itself is enough for success. The studio has once again proven that it is possible to create profitable games without relying on these aggressive monetization strategies. This gives hope that more developers will follow a similar model and prioritize a quality player experience.

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