A Historic Demographic Shift: Texas No Longer White Majority After Nearly 200 Years



by SEDEDIN DEDOVIC

A Historic Demographic Shift: Texas No Longer White Majority After Nearly 200 Years
© David McNew / Getty Images

Texas has undergone a significant demographic shift, with Latinos now surpassing whites as the largest population group in the state, as indicated by the latest census data from June of this year. The findings reveal that Latinos constitute 40.2 percent of the population in Texas, whereas non-Latin American whites make up about 39.8 percent, according to the "Voice of America." This demographic transformation confirms trends that emerged in mid-2022 when Latinos first assumed the majority in Texas, a state that had a white majority since 1850.

Demographer Lloyd Potter attributes this shift to the comparatively youthful Latino population, as younger demographics tend to have more children. Moreover, Latinos constitute the largest immigrant group in Texas, underlining their significant role in reshaping the state's demographic landscape.

Texas' prospects may be impacted by the shortage of an educated labor force required Sharon Navarro, a political science professor at the University of Texas in San Antonio, notes that historical voting patterns among Latinos have shifted.

While they traditionally aligned with the Democratic party, this is no longer the case. Latinos in Texas are increasingly voting based on issues that align with the broader population, such as employment, the economy, education, and healthcare.

Navarro highlights the importance of addressing the educational divide. In the long term, Texas' prospects may be impacted by the shortage of an educated labor force required for future jobs. Addressing this educational disparity is crucial to ensuring the state's continued economic growth and stability.

"In the long term, the situation in Texas could be affected by the fact that there is not enough educated labor force for the jobs of the future. Figures show that 95 percent of adult whites and about 70 percent of Latin Americans have at least completed high school," Navarro pointed out.

Navarro underscores the significant contributions that Latin Americans can make, both economically and politically, emphasizing their potential to enhance Texas' overall prosperity and influence in the United States. As this demographic shift continues, Texas stands to benefit from embracing the diverse perspectives and experiences that Latinos bring to the table, fostering a more inclusive and vibrant future for the state.

Texas American