University of Houston Study: E-Cigarette Use Linked to Asthma Risk

New research from the University of Houston has unveiled a concerning correlation between vaping electronic cigarettes and an increased risk of developing asthma, prompting urgent calls for reevaluation of vaping habits and policies

by Sededin Dedovic
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University of Houston Study: E-Cigarette Use Linked to Asthma Risk
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Scientists from the University of Houston have released a study showing that individuals who indulge in vaping electronic cigarettes can acquire a predisposition to developing asthma in a very short period. The results of this study indicate that otherwise completely healthy individuals, after using these cigarettes for just 30 days, have a 252 percent higher risk of developing asthma later in life, as reported by the Journal of the American Medical Association.

One of the authors of this research, Professor Dr. Adriana Perez, stated that previous studies have also identified the health risks associated with such cigarettes, but this is the first time that it has been scientifically proven how much time is needed for serious health damage to occur and for significant predispositions to develop asthma.

The clear establishment of a mere one-month period of indulgence in such cigarettes, which points to a high likelihood of future development of this type of respiratory disease, will hopefully help people think carefully before engaging in such habits, she added.

There is a particular emphasis on the need for further analysis of the impact of e-cigarettes on the health of young people, but it is also necessary to define the danger to other age groups. In the United States, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, absenteeism from work and school due to asthma, mortality, and treatment of this disease result in annual costs of $300 billion.

Stricter tobacco regulations and comprehensive preventive policies are necessary to prevent the conditions conducive to asthma development, especially through the use of e-cigarettes, emphasized Perez. Data from international health institutions show that nearly 300 million people worldwide suffer from asthma, and the number of cases increases by 50 percent every decade.

Some studies suggest that slightly less than half of those affected are at serious risk of more severe respiratory complications. It is also noted that the global number of e-cigarette users has exceeded 82 million. These cigarettes are most commonly used on the African continent, where over 20 million smokers indulge in them, while in Europe, this number stands at 16.8 million, and in the United States, 16 million people use e-cigarettes.

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