Ona Carbonell on problems related to baby-breastfeed at the Olympics!



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Ona Carbonell on problems related to baby-breastfeed at the Olympics!

Ona Carbonell is a great swimmer who has a lot of success behind her In 2020 she had her first child, and at one point she had to choose between a child and the Olympics, ie her career. BBC journalists spoke to her during the filming of a film about her journey, the birth of a child and the competition in Tokyo
"I hope my story shows other women it's possible to be a mother and an athlete," she says.

"It's a wonderful thing." Starting Over is a film in which there are many shocking scenes, even one in which the lead actress speaks "I am incredibly exhausted and I'm feeling a lot of pressure," she says.

"I get home and I don't even have the energy to pick Kai up." Although Carbonell did not seem to be able to bring the child, she was still allowed to, but she risked the move. "The Olympics told me I could bring my son, but he would have to stay in a separate place.

"That would have meant that every time I had to breastfeed my son, I would have to break the Olympic bubble - possibly putting myself, my son and the whole team at risk." "If it's possible to bring your coach, it should be possible to bring your husband or a parent along with your baby," she says.

Breastfed

When she returned, she stopped with breastfed "I didn't think this would end like this and wanted to continue for more time," she says. "But that's one of the great obstacles for a female athlete and hopefully this will change in the coming years."

With these situations, mothers have difficult times, and even this can lead to sportswomen deciding not to have children at that time "It would be good if there were more rooms for mothers to breastfeed in," she says.

"We also need more information for new mothers. I'm pregnant at the moment with my second child and I'm still training, but it's very confusing to figure out what we can and cannot do." "Some of my team-mates decided to postpone being mothers and, in the end, it was too late for them," she says. "It's not necessary."